Information on font licenses


#1

Good morning,

I am writing because I would like to ask for more information on the use of Fonts with SIL Open Font License.

For example:
Copyright © 2011-12, Name Autor (XXX@XXXXX), with Reserved Fonts Names ‘XXXX’.

This Font Software is licensed under the SIL Open Font License, Version 1.1.
This license is copied below, and is also available with a FAQ at: http:scripts.sil.org/OFL


SIL OPEN FONT LICENSE Version 1.1 - 26 February 2007

I found many fonts with this license on free font web sites where you can download these fonts for free and where they are free to use and declared free for commercial purposes.
I tried to understand what the license includes on the official SIL web site but I still have doubts about it and before creating something wants to be sure that I can freely use these fonts.

So I’m here to ask if you can give me confirmation and tell me if I can use the fonts that have SIL Open Font License, Version 1.1. in my projects like logos, packaging, brochure, flyers that I have to resell at the clients or for example create a graphic poster that I then sell online via e-commerce site. Can you also tell me if there are any printing limits or other types of limitations for commercial use?
I need to clarify this so if you could please simplify the answer as I find the text on the various sites extremely confusing, I would be very grateful.

Thank you and greetings.


#2

Hi Sara,

The OFL-FAQ addresses this question for OFL-licensed fonts no matter where they are hosted or which website you got them from (also check the license inside the font to double-check that it’s really a font released under OFL):

Question: 1.1 Can I use the fonts for a book or other print publication, to create logos or other graphics or even to manufacture objects based on their outlines?

Answer: Yes. You are very welcome to do so. Authors of fonts released under the OFL allow you to use their font software as such for any kind of design work. No additional license or permission is required, unlike with some other licenses. Some examples of these uses are: logos, posters, business cards, stationery, video titling, signage, t-shirts, personalised fabric, 3D-printed/laser-cut shapes, sculptures, rubber stamps, cookie cutters and lead type.

Question: 1.1.1 Does that restrict the license or distribution of that artwork?

Answer: No. You remain the author and copyright holder of that newly derived graphic or object. You are simply using an open font in the design process. It is only when you redistribute, bundle or modify the font itself that other conditions of the license have to be respected (see below for more details).

Question: 1.1.2 Is any kind of acknowledgement required?

Answer: No. Font authors may appreciate being mentioned in your artwork’s acknowledgements alongside the name of the font, possibly with a link to their website, but that is not required.

I understand your concern given that many font licenses out there have various restrictions but this is not the case for fonts which authors (copyright holders) have chosen the OFL as their license. It’s only if you modify the font itself (we’re not talking about graphic outlines or artwork based on the font but the actual font software) that they are some restrictions but it does not seem to be the case here.

I hope this clarifies. Wishing you all the best for your design projects.

If you haven’t read it already, we recommend you look at the rest of the Frequently Asked Questions document on http://scripts.sil.org/OFL-FAQ_web It covers many practical issues in using OFL fonts.


#3

Hello! Thank you so much for answering me so quickly and for giving me confirmation that I can use the fonts in my personal and commercial projects.
Thanks again!