Accurate credits

I don’t know how widely this happens, but in our context, books are usually created in a local language collection. They are later adapted for use in a source language collection. Since books made into subsequent local languages are actually derived from the LWC source collection, not the original book, someone has questioned why the credits say we have adapted the book “from” the local language book. I do think that the original book should be mentioned in the credits, so I am wondering if the credit might be more accurately worded if it were to read:
This book is an adaptation of the original, Title , Copyright ©…

That would be true without actually implying that it was translated directly from that language.
The original credits would then appear below as always.

Hi Beth,
Can you show me what you see now? What I see is pretty much what you’re asking for:

image

Oh, wait, I think I see. Sorry for being slow.

If the history is

Book in C, derived from
Book in B, derived from
Book in A

Then in Bloom, we credit “A” rather than “B”:
Adapted from the original, A ...

If I understand correctly, you are pointing out that the message is misleading, because the translators of C weren’t actually working with A.

On the other hand, I think it’s vital to retain the acknowledgement of the original, by the original publisher. I think this is more important than listing which book was the source of translation (indeed, translators will sometimes be reading the original language as well as subsequent translations in the chain).

So perhaps there’s a way to tweak the wording to retain focus on the original without suggesting that it was necessarily the source of the adaptation.

Yes, exactly. I had noticed it earlier, but thought no one else would be bothered by it. Then someone was.

It would be nice if it could somehow be tweaked to cover BOTH books adapted directly from the original, and those that are adapted from an LWC.

This book is an adaptation of the original (rather than from the original), Title , Copyright ©…

It’s a subtle distinction.

Bethann

Hi Beth,
Thanks for figuring out that change. Before we make the change (and cause all the translations to also have to be updated), can I “get a second on this motion” from someone?

Yes, I second the motion.

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I’ll “third” the motion.

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